Origins and Impact of EDS in Connective Tissues and Skin | oneedsvoice

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Origins and Impact of EDS in Connective Tissues and Skin

study id #: NCT02721797

condition: Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

status: Recruiting

purpose:

Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS) is an inherited disease of collagen, found in connective tissues, such as skin. EDS patients suffer from joint and skin problems (skin hyperextensibility, joint hypermobility) along with a large range of other disorders, including, delayed wound healing with atrophic scarring, easy bruising, tissue fragility, gastrointestinal and gum problems. There are many different types of EDS, with different mechanisms of action, and not all of these are well understood. This study will use advanced microscopy techniques called atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to analyse the changes in collagen as a result of EDS, compared to normal collagen. These changes will be viewed at the micron and nanoscale level (between 1,000 to 100,000 x magnification), and will focus on the differences in collagen construction through a process called cross-linking. These changes could potentially help clinicians understand the root cause of EDS symptoms, and provide a deeper knowledge of cross-linking disorders in collagen. Increasing our knowledge of how collagen is affected in EDS patients, may lead to improved treatment options for patients.

intervention: Procedure: Orthopaedic & Gynaecology surgery
Patients will have the surgery they require for their treatment. During surgery, debrided tissues will be retained for research. No treatment plans will be altered for this research.

start date: April 1, 2017

estimated completion: December 2020

last updated: May 1, 2017

phase of development: N/A

size / enrollment: 35

study design: Observational Model: Case Control
Time Perspective: Prospective

primary outcomes:

  • Histological changes in EDS compared with healthy collagen using light microscopy after staining [ Time Frame:1-5 years ]
  • Collagen morphological changes in EDS compared with healthy collagen using AFM and SEM [ Time Frame:1-5 years ]
  • Collagen topographical changes in EDS compared with healthy collagen using AFM and SEM [ Time Frame:1-5 years ]

secondary outcomes:

  • Collagen Young's modulus changes in EDS compared with healthy collagen using AFM [ Time Frame:1-5 years ] AFM will be used to calculate the Young's (elastic) modulus of the EDS and healthy collagen. This will be measured in Pascals (GPa).
  • Collagen nanoscale adhesion changes in EDS compared with healthy collagen using AFM [ Time Frame:1-5 years ] AFM will be used to calculate the changes in adhesion force of the EDS and healthy collagen. This will be measured in Newtons (nN).Quantitative outcomes: changes in Young's (elastic) modulus, changes in adhesion force, changes in single molecule pulling force
  • Collagen nanoscale single molecule pulling force in EDS compared with healthy collagen using AFM [ Time Frame:1-5 years ] AFM will be used to calculate the changes in pulling force of single molecules of EDS and healthy collagen. This will be measured in Newtons (nN).

inclusion criteria: - Adult (18+) patients requiring elective surgery as part of their treatment plan who fulfil the Brighton criteria for Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS)/EDS hypermobility type with significant joint hypermobility (Beighton score of 6 and above) and /or have evidence of significant connective tissue weakness, or rectal/vaginal prolapse

exclusion criteria: - Patients with insufficient ability in English to give informed consent, if a translator is not present.
- Patients with severe developmental disorders, precluding their consent for research

sponsor: University College London Hospitals

contacts: Adam Strange, BSc, MSc(R) rmhvstr@ucl.ac.uk
Suzanne Emerton randd@uclh.nhs.uk

investigators: Principal Investigator: Hanna Kazkaz, MBChB, MSc UCLH
Principal Investigator: Laurent Bozec, PhD, BSc UCL
Study Director: Adam Strange, BSc, MSc(R) UCL

locations: United Kingdom